Dan Gable

In 1972 Dan Gable became the first American to win a World and Olympic title in consecutive years. After winning the World Championships in 1971, Gable won the gold medal at the Munich Olympics without surrendering a single point in his six matches.

Collegiately, Gable wrestled at Iowa State University and won two NCAA titles with a 119-1 career record. He also won three state titles at West Waterloo with a 64-0 record. In high school and collegiate competition he compiled an incredible record of 183-1. His only loss was to Larry Owings during the finals of the 1970 NCAA championships during his senior year.

s_gable_iAs a coach, Dan Gable is quite possibly the greatest of all time. From 1977 through 1997 Gable led the University of Iowa to 15 NCAA team titles and a 355-21-5 dual meet record. The Hawkeye’s also won nine NCAA titles in a row from 1978-1986.

Gable was also the coach of several international teams as well. He was head coach of the 1980, 1984, and 2000 Olympic teams.

Did you know?
Dan Gable pinned his way through the 1969 NCAA tournament.
Dan Gable Corner
gablearea

Two large walls and a huge display case chronicle the career of Dan Gable, the museum’s namesake. On display are the warm-ups and shoes he wore in the 1972 Olympics in Munich, where he won the gold medal at 149.5 pounds without surrendering a single point in six matches. Also on display is a large board that shows his entire coaching record at the University of Iowa, where he won 21 consecutive Big Ten team titles and 15 NCAA team championships.
Dan Gable articles

Almost Immortal by Eric Neel

Gable dominated at wrestler and coach by Mike Puma

Dan Gable: The greatest fighter that never was by Robert Gardner

The pride of Iowa by Richard Hoffer

Even on his custom crutches, Gable, Iowa’s native son, doesn’t disappoint by John Garrity

Troy and Terry Steiner by Austin Murphy

Real Fire Brands by Merrell Noden

A kid who doesn’t kid around by Herman Weiskopf

The pancake man flattens ’em by Herman Weiskopf

Comments are closed.